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Calder Rd 1
Mirfield Calder Rd

Calder Road around 1900, The back to back houses in this photo are marked on some old maps as Phillip Royd cottages. Although this name seems to have been forgotten now at the time of the photograph Phillip Royd would have been the locally used name for this end of Lower Hopton.
Before Lower and Upper Hopton gained separate identities Lower Hopton was often referred to as Hopton Bottom.
The building in the foreground where the bus stop now stands was known as Fanny Etty's Cottage.

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28th August 1852

Innkeepers Fined.—

On. Monday, before John Hague and J. B. Greenwood, Esqrs., William Heslop, the keeper of the Yew Tree Inn, Mirfield, was charged by Haworth and Asquith, the Mirfield constables, with having company in his house at half-past twelve o'clock in the morning of Sunday, the 15th instant. Fined 1 and 12s. 6d. costs.— John Shepherd, the keeper of the Flower Pot Inn, was also charged with having company in his house during the usual hours of divine service, on Sunday afternoon, the 15th inst. Fined 1 and 15s. costs.

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7th December 1880

COLLIERY ACCIDENT AT MIRFIELD.
TWO MEN KILLED.

Yesterday au inquest took place at the Flower Pot Inn, Lower Hopton, on view of the bodies of John William Ellam, aged 21, residing at Chapel Hill, Hopton; and John  Walker, aged 21, of Kirkheaton (both unmarried), who were killed on Wednesday by a colliery accident at the Gregory Spring Coliiery, Hopton, Mirfield, belonging to Messrs. Howgates, Day, and Holt, manufactures,Dewsbury and Ravensthorpe. Mr. J. Jarrard, sub-inspector of mines, attended, and Mr. Benjamin Chadwick, solicitor, Dewsbury, watched the proceedings on behalf of the owners of the pit. It transpired that at five minutes past two o'clock on Wednesday morning the unfortunate men were working in the pit and engaged filling a corve with coal when a large stone, weighing about three tons, fell upon them and crushed them both to death. The hole was properly timbered up to within three yards of the face of the coal, and this space was left open. A crack in the roof was heard by two hurriers shortly before the stone fell, and on mentioning the fact to Walker, the latter replied that he thought the noise came from the bottom of the pit, and they continued working without further propping that part of the roof under which they were working. Joshua Hill, one of the harriers, left them to take away a corve of coal a few minutes after the crack was heard, and on his return he found Ellam and Walker buried under a large stone. He raised an alarm, and John Barker, the deputy-nightviewer, and a number of men were soon on the spot. The dead bodies were extricated from the debris and were removed to the Flower Pot Inn. A verdict of "Accidentally killed" was returned.

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27th May 1882

Assaults on the Police.—

Yesterday, at the Dewsbury West Riding Police-court, John Moody, a resident of Hopton, was brought before the bench on three separate charges— first, that of being drunk on licensed premises, and refusing to leave when requested, and also with assaulting Police-sergeant Raeburn and Police constable Glossop. Mr. Simpson defended. .It appeared that the defendant and a man named Sheard went to the Flower Pot Inn, Hopton, in a state of drunkenness. The landlord ordered them out, but they refused to go, and stripped off their coats to fight him. He sent for the police, and Sergeant Raeburn tried to persuade the men to go away, but they still refused. He then got hold of Sheard, with whom he had a long struggle, but eventually he got the man on a cart for the purpose of taking him to the lock-up. He then demanded Moody's name, but he refused to give it, and he and the officer struggled together for half an hour. In the meantime Sheard got out of the cart and ran away. With the assistance of Police constable Glossop, Moody was at last got to the lock-up, and he assaulted both officers. The Justices ordered him to pay fines amounting to 50s. and costs, or be imprisoned for ten weeks.— John Parkin, of Rastrick, was charged with being drunk and riotous and assaulting a policeman on Tuesday last. He was making a great disturbance near the Post-office at Mirfield, and was requested to go away, but he refused, and on being apprehended he became very violent and struck and kicked the officer two or three times. He was fined 30s. and costs.

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23rd January 1885

THE SUICIDE AT MIRFIELD.—

Yesterday an inquest was held at the Ship Inn, Mirfield, touching the death of John Wilson, coal miner, residing at Hopton, who was found drowned in the Calder, at Shepley Bridge, on Wednesday morning. The evidence showed that the deceased left the Flower Pot Inn on the 19th December, at 9.40 p.m., in company with his daughter, the worse for liquor. When they had got about 100 yards along Beck lane the deceased caught hold of his daughter and attempted to cut her throat with his pocket knife. She got away from him, and the same night he jumped into the river. His body was not found until the 21st inst. A verdict to the effect that the deceased had drowned himself while in a state of intoxication was returned.

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